How to find your dream career?

 

A few decades ago the business world was a whole lot slower than it is today. The average person was expected to work in just two or three different fields but fast forward to today and that number has jumped to twenty! That’s twenty different jobs in more than seven industries or a change every four years.

If those facts above show us anything, it’s that a career change is certainly possible. You shouldn’t feel stuck in a job or an industry you don’t like, simply upskill or ‘sideskill’ make a change and move on.

Although changing careers isn’t as easy as it sounds, it’s still certainly doable and we’ve got a few tips, tricks and steps below to help you find your dream career through education, skill development and research. Take a look.

Think about your strengths first

When deciding on a dream career, it’s best, to begin with looking into the suite of skills that you’re strongest at. This is because you likely don’t want to head into a career that you’re entirely clueless about or have no real interest in.

Although, of course, you can learn skills and be great at anything you put your mind to, it may just better a better decision to stick with those skills that come naturally to you because you’re interested in them. The jobs or career that comes from these skills is likely to be far more organic, fulfilling and a lot more fun for you.

If you’re not too sure what you’re good at, take a personality test, skills test and an interesting test. These will show what your leading skill is. Then use this data to help search for a career.

Your past is the key to your future

This tip might sound like something a spiritual healer would say, however, when business and careers are concerned, the past really is the key. If you’ve noticed from evaluating your past that you’re stuck in an employment loop, then you need to make certain that your next ‘dream job’ isn’t simply going to become just another loop.

Think about which tasks, jobs and research projects really brought out the best in you and what job or career field you think could make these feelings appear again. Don’t simply slide back into the easiest job you can find, really try to think about what makes you happy and learn the skills required to succeed in this ‘happy job’.

Interview friends, family and strangers

If you’re ready to get really serious about finding your dream career, then you need to go online and talk to people who work in those careers. Find out about their history, how they made their way to that job and what sort of things they like to do in their day-to-day lives.

A few tips to help you find or meet these people are to ask family and friends and search online platforms like LinkedIn, MeetUp and more. These sites will give you a clear view at who these successful people are, what they do and give you a direct means to contact them.

Learn, Learn, Learn!

Now’s the time to do whatever it takes. If your dream job requires a whole new suite of skills, strengths and experiences – then get them. We live in an age of unlimited information, so take advantage of it. Enrol in local workshops, learn from YouTube, take tutoring classes on platforms like Cluey Learning and read plenty of books.

It’s easier than ever to learn new skills and with most websites being entirely free, all you need to do is find the motivation and the time.

Focus on what makes you happy

The main focus of your dream career search should be to look for a job that makes you happy and matches your moral code. It’s a good idea to think of the search this way; what type of work would you do for free?

Take some time to think about careers that involve work that you would happily do for free and then search for jobs in this realm.

Lastly, forget about money, opulence and impressive careers. You shouldn’t risk your happiness because you’re in search of a career that focuses on money and prestige. Never forget that you are the only one who controls your happiness, so choose a career path that is for you.


Julie Melville

Learn something new every day.